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SPARE A THOUGHT for the people who live under Traditional Authority Phambala, in Ntcheu. In December last year, hyenas in this area killed a woman. As if this was not enough, four children survived attacks, sustaining injuries and were scarred for life in the process. Livestock has not been spared as well. All this in a day’s work. spotted-hyena-kenya

Ntcheu has a reputation for hyena attacks. It would seem, however, that every single year, authorities appear unprepared to deal with such and inspire confidence by saving lives. That hyenas keep outsmarting humans for many years would be laughable (sic) were it not so tragic. Yes, there is only so much that can be done and casualties will always be likely but is enough being done to ensure that minimum standards of safety and security are met in such areas as T/A Phambala’s?

It would appear as if nothing is being done at all! Reports say the rangers who were deployed to deal with hyenas only lasted three days and went away. Apparently there was no money to keep the rangers in the area for longer. So, being the thinking and imaginative Malawians we are, what was the best solution? Remove the rangers and leave the people in the area exposed and vulnerable to attacks. What is one life lost, anyway?  Read More

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A woman sells groundnuts as an entrepreneurial means to support her familly. Blantyre, May 2015. – Thoko Chikondi

THREE WEEKS before my third birthday, in 1987, then Burkina Faso leader, Captain Thomas Sankara delivered a speech on the occasion of International Women’s Day. Several thousands of women from all walks of Burkinabe life gathered to listen to the speech and many more accessed it across various media. As a man himself, the irony of the occasion was not lost to Sankara.

“It is not an everyday occurrence for a man to speak to so many women at once,” he began by saying, adding: “Nor does it happen every day that a man suggests to so many women new battles to be joined.”

It is in a similar context of thinking that I frame this entry this week. “A man,” Sankara further says, “experiences his first bashfulness the minute he becomes conscious he is looking at a woman. So, sisters, you will understand that despite the joy and pleasure it gives me to be speaking to you, I still remain a man who sees in every one of you a mother, a sister, or a wife.” Read More

Rhythmic Revolution: Captain Sankara on his guitar, one of the few things he owned

Rhythmic Revolution: Captain Sankara on his guitar, one of the few things he owned

EARLIER THIS month, the people of Burkina Faso celebrated the anniversary of the August 4 Revolution that brought Captain Thomas Sankara into power. Given recent developments in the country – the ouster of long-ruling president, Blaise Compaore – and subsequent attempts at destabilising the transition government, the occasion was marked with great reflection.

The memory of Sankara is not only for the Burkinabe to hold. As a committed pan-African, Sankara’s contributions towards the shaping of African consciousness are not only enormous, but they have also stood the test of time. From renaming Upper Volta to Burkina Faso – Land of the Upright People – to challenging practices of post-colonial States in relation to the colonising presence, Sankara set a solid and futuristic framework for thinking about governance and development. And, he was not just about the talk!

“We must make every effort to see that our actions live up to our words and be vigilant with regards to our social behaviour so as not to lay ourselves open to attack by counter-revolutionaries lying in wait. If we always keep in mind that the interests of the masses take precedence over our personal interests, then we will avoid going off course,” once thundered Sankara. Read More